Joy at the Sound by Roger McGough

mcgoughRoger McGough has been described as ‘the patron saint of poetry’. Joy at the Sound is a beautiful and poignant poem with a wonderful ending. It plays with language and lends itself ideally to work in the classroom.

For an introduction to the poet, watch an interview with Roger McGough here. There is a mini presentation on this poem here, including links to some other videos.

Here is how it begins:

Joy at the silver birch in the morning sunshine
Joy at the spring-green of its fingertips

Joy at the swirl of cold milk in the blue bowl
Joy at the blink of its bubbles

Read the full text of the poem here. I cannot find a video version of a performance of this poem.

Suggested activities

Performance – divide this poem into verses. Ask pairs or groups of children to perform (not read) their couple of lines. Different voices? Varied volumes? Individual or group recitation? Actions or drama? Sound effects? Move towards a smooth and powerful class performance. Film it, or edit parts together. Or create a sound picture of the poem by recording the audio with special effects.

Artwork – create a picture, or use web images, to create a Powerpoint slideshow telling the poem. A soundtrack recitation could be added. Bring it to life! How would the moving last verse be portrayed?

Writing – after really getting to know the poem through performance or recitation, you could lead your class into writing. Brainstorm a variety of sounds which bring joy to the children. The lid of the ice cream carton being opened… the bark of your new puppy …the creak of the garden gate as the postman brings you birthday cards…

Think about the way the poet has organised his memories into pairs. How are they linked? Why has he done this? Ask the children to think about grouping their sound memories. Think about how even unappealing places (such as the dentist) can have a joyful sound associated with them.

Children can move towards finding their own poetic voices to write a version of this poem. To extend the fun, once you have given them feedback, ask the children to improve their poems and then to learn them at home. Next time, start the lesson by listening to their performances of their own work. Sounds like fun!

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