Let no one steal your dreams by Paul Cookson

I used to encourage my class to follow their dreams. I used to ask them to think of what they wanted to become – a great inventor, a doctor, a professor, a teacher, a designer, an actor, a musician… and inevitably a footballer. I told them about people I knew who had followed their dreams, no matter what setbacks they might have faced.

Once we had shared our different dreams, I asked the children to think about how they might get there. What do they have to do now to succeed in achieving that dream? I was trying to get across the idea that everything they do now, at school and at home, can play a part in the journey towards that dream. Yes, I was trying to get them to think about working hard and behaving well, but I also wanted them to consider the bigger picture and how their lives could contribute to making the world a better place.

If someone wanted to be a footballer or a wrestler, then fair enough – but I did try to suggest other occupations which might benefit the world, and also to try to break down gender expectations and move away from stereotypes.

This poem, by Paul Cookson, picks up beautifully on this idea. It is perfect for a PSHE lesson looking at jobs and growing up. It is also perfect for one of those introductory lessons when pupils meet their new teacher and are looking ahead to a new school year. This is how the poem begins:

Let no one steal your dreams
Let no one tear apart
The burning of ambition
That fires the drive inside your heart.

Let no one steal your dreams
Let no one tell you that you can’t
Let no one hold you back
Let no one tell you that you won’t.

Here is a link to the full text which can be downloaded.

Here is an unusual video performance of this poem:

Here is a video of poet Paul Cookson performing another of his poems in a workshop with children:

Suggested activities
1. Ask children to think about being grown up. What will they be doing? How can they make the world a better place?
2. Share these ideas. Then consider: what do I have to do now to make that dream come true?
3. Share with them some well-known people who have fulfilled their dreams. Ensure there are positive images of females within the selection and a good mix of cultures. Try to avoid the obvious (David Beckham etc).
4. Work towards a class performance of the poem.
5. Ask each child to write their dream down and list three things they need to do this year to make it come true. Seal these in an envelope and open them on the last day of term.

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How to get your class to perform a poem

Performing poetry? Isn’t that a bit elitist? A teacher once said to me how performing poetry was very “public school”. How much farther from the truth could you get?
There is no better way to get children animated and excited about a poem than performing it. Here are a few tips:
1. Divide the poem into verses. Ask pairs or groups of children to perform (not read) their couple of lines.
2. Ask children to decide how to perform the lines. You could put these questions on the board:
Loud or quiet?
Fast or slow?
Serious or funny?
Silly voices or normal voices?
One voice at a time or everyone together?
Should you add actions or drama?
Do you need sound effects?
Which words should you exaggerate?
3. Move towards a smooth and powerful class performance. Film it, or edit parts together. Or create a sound picture of the poem by recording the audio with special effects.
4. Film it and put it on the school website.
5. Perform it for a parents’ assembly or in front of the rest of the school. If there’s a repeated chorus, get the whole school to join in.

There is an excellent website, called Perform-a-Poem, organised by Children’s Laureate Michael Rosen, giving many tips on getting children to perform poetry. Do check it out! Here is a super example from the Perform-a-Poem website on how a poem can be performed.

Here are some CBBC stars performing poems:

Here is Michael Rosen performing Chocolate Cake:

Here are some children performing poetry. Your class could watch these and suggest how the performance could be improved.

Television by Roald Dahl

Television. Good or bad? Well, this poem by Roald Dahl will be familiar to many primary school pupils. It appears in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory as a song by the Oompa-Loompas. The poem tells of the dangers of children watching too much television (or any television at all) – how it dulls the senses and kills the imagination. The only antedote is reading. Who could disagree?

Well, Dahl grew up without television and this certainly didn’t seem to do him any harm. But the medium of television has helped Dahl to become the favourite author of so many children – with television and film adaptations taking his stories to so many more children, beyond the reach of the written format. This article, on the official Roald Dahl website, discusses whether Dahl was ever really anti-television or whether he was being deliberatley provocative in this controversial poem. Whatever his thoughts, this is a great talking point for children!

Here is an extract from the opening of the poem:

The most important thing we’ve learned,
So far as children are concerned,
Is never, NEVER, NEVER let
Them near your television set —
Or better still, just don’t install
The idiotic thing at all.
In almost every house we’ve been,
We’ve watched them gaping at the screen.
They loll and slop and lounge about,
And stare until their eyes pop out.

You can read the full text of the poem here. Watch a lovely version of the poem here:

Suggested activities
1. This is a long poem. Break it up. Cut it up into pieces and give pairs rhyming couplets to perform. Number them. Conduct the performance. Keep doing this until the performance is perfect. Encourage the pairs to learn their two lines and then discuss which words to emphasise, whether a silly voice is needed, and how to best bring out the comedy. Video the performance and put it on your school website.
2. Open up a discussion about television by taking phrases from the poem. Do you agree or disagree? Why?
Try all that shocking ghastly junk or
IT ROTS THE SENSE IN THE HEAD!
IT KILLS IMAGINATION DEAD! or
How used they keep themselves contented
Before this monster was invented?
3. Stage a debate in the class. Half must argue for television being the best thing, and half for books being the best thing. Ensure everyone has their say.
4. Lead into writing a persuasive argument or a discussion. Ensure you use three strong arguments to support your case – with evidence from the poem. Make sure you include a summary of the opposite argument. Rehearse persuasive language.

A Chance in France by Pie Corbett

A Chance in France

corbettI really like this poem by Pie Corbett, a great educationalist who is passionate about writing fiction and prose. This poem uses wordplay to stretch the imagination of children – and is pretty handy, too, in finding out how much they know about the world and its cities and countries.

Following the recommendation from mum to ‘stay at home’, the poet seeks to be more ambitious and courageous by heading first for France, neatly rhymed internally with France. From then on, we have a destination partnered with a rhyme – day/St Tropex, did/Madrid, tussels/Brussels. Here is how the poem begins:

‘Stay at home,’
Mum said,
But I took a chance in France,
turned grey for the day in St Tropez,
forgot what I did in Madrid,
had some tussels in Brussels
with a trio from Rio,
lost my way in Bombay,
nothing wrong in Hong Kong,
felt calmer in Palma,
and quite nice in Nice,
yes, felt finer in China,…

You can read the whole text of the poem here:

https://thehenrybrothers.wordpress.com/2011/05/04/a-chance-in-france/

Here is a video of Pie Corbett talking about writing poetry. It does not relate specifically to the task above, but gives you an idea of the man and his passion for writing.

Suggested activities
1. Begin with a class reading or performance. For advice on how to do this most effectively, follow this link.
2. Then break the poem up and give pairs one line to analyse each. Give out atlases or use the internet to research the place mentioned. Where is it? How do they speak there? What is it famous for? How long would it take to get there? What might it feel like to live there?
3. Then ask children to add more lines, perhaps using places they have been on holiday or would like to visit. Add these lines on and shuffle them about to get the best effect. Move towards a new version of the poem, all written by the children.
4. Make a class performance of the new poem and entertain the rest of the school with it at assembly. Perhaps you could do a wall display with pictures of all the places mentioned.